Origami Torah

Posted on October 9th, 2017

From JTeach.org


Download the Origami Torah Instructions.
 

Citron Sun Catchers for Sukkot

Posted on October 2nd, 2017

This article is featured in our Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here.
 


By Brenda Ponnay for ToriAvey.com


The citron is a fragrant citrus fruit, similar to a lemon but with less pulpy juiciness. In Hebrew, it’s called an etrog. The citron is an ancient fruit. It has been used as a Jewish blessing since Biblical times, and it’s one of the Four Species for Sukkot that are mentioned in the Torah.

Citrons are not really used for food in their natural state– they are really dry and sour– but they are sometimes candied at the end of Sukkot and for Tu B’Shevat. Citrons are pretty rare, and can be somewhat difficult to obtain here in the states, so I thought it would be nice to represent the citron in a craft instead.  These are fun little sun catchers that would look really pretty decorating your sukkah. They’re also really easy to make!

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Humor Is Your Secret Parenting Weapon

Posted on September 25th, 2017
BY CARLA NAUMBURG for Kveller


Sometimes I put a pair of cotton princess underwear on my head before I wake up my daughters in the morning. Sometimes I recite their breakfast options in a ridiculous French accent. I smear bubbles across my face while I’m giving them a bath and tell them absurd stories about the day their father and I selected them from the discount rack at The Baby Store because that’s where babies come from.

I open my mouth to yell at them and end up launching myself across the living room with a loud TRA-LA-LAAAAA ala Captain Underpants. (Speaking of which, we do, in fact, make our fair share of Uranus jokes around here.) I activate Mommy Robot Procedures and make loud beeping noises while I press the moles on their arms to change them from Grumpy Mode to Happy Mode and, most nights around 5:30 PM, to Sit Your Tushy In The Chair and Eat Your Dinner Mode.

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Make a Shofar to Celebrate the Jewish New Year

Posted on September 18th, 2017
This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here

BY CINDY HOPPER for AlphaMom


Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins at sundown on Friday, September 18th and lasts through Sunday, September 20th.  During Rosh Hashanah a Shofar, traditionally made from a hollowed out rams horn, is blown to awake and inspire.  The Shofar is such an important part of this holiday that sometimes Rosh Hashanah is called Yom Teruah, which means “day of the Shofar blast” in Hebrew.

With a few supplies you can make your own Shofar horn. Gather 3 toilet paper rolls per horn, a party horn, masking tape, glue, paint brush, scissors and white and brown paint.

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High Holiday Resources from Our Friends at jkidphilly

Posted on September 11th, 2017

This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here


Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. The celebration of this holiday is marked with both joy and solemnity, as it is the day on which the whole world is judged for the coming year.  Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world, as it was on this day that God created man on the 6th day of creation.

Print, color and mail Rosh Hashanah postcards to your family and friends!
Download and print our Rosh Hashanah info sheet
Rosh Hashanah Hannah and her friends on Shalom Sesame rock out the New Year on this video clip.
G-dcast presents Shofar Callin': The Rosh Hashanah Song  

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